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Anderson Silva says tainted supplements might have caused failed drug test, hopes to be cleared for Roy Jones Jr. bout

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Anderson Silva Post Fight EL MMAfighting.com Esther Lin, MMA Fighting

Anderson Silva continues to deny that he knowingly used performance-enhancing drugs. And he said Tuesday that it’s possible the failed drug test could be blamed on tainted supplements.

“Maybe the supplements I’m using are contaminated,” Silva told TMZ. “I don’t know. I’m just waiting. Because obviously if I take these steroids, I’m stupid. I’m too old. I’m not at the start of my career. I’m [at the] finish.”

Silva, one of the greatest UFC champions of all time, said his legal team is currently working with USADA, the UFC’s anti-doping partner, on the case. Silva, 42, tested positive for two banned substances — methyltestosterone and a diuretic — in a sample collected Oct. 26, sources confirmed with MMA Fighting earlier this month. Methyltestosterone is considered a synthetic anabolic steroid.

“The Spider” is facing up to a two-year suspension or possibly even more if USADA takes into account his past failed drug test. Silva tested positive for the steroids drostanolone and androsterone in 2015. At the time, Silva claimed that the banned substances had come from a Thai sex drug and the Nevada Athletic Commission (NAC) suspended him one year for the violation.

“I’m just waiting for USADA and my lawyers,” Silva said. “And hopefully they came back soon for fight for Roy Jones.”

Silva, who held the UFC middleweight title from 2006 to 2013, has been hoping to compete in boxing against Roy Jones Jr. for years. Jones recently said he was retired from boxing, but left open the door for a bout against his longtime friend Silva.

“That’s my dream,” Silva said. “Hopefully, this fight comes.”

Silva (34-8, 1 NC) beat Derek Brunson by unanimous decision in his most recent fight, at UFC 208 in February 2017. The Brazilian legend said he would not retire from MMA, even if he’s banned four years by USADA.

As for his legacy being tainted due to the most recent drug test-failure, Silva said it’s complicated and he denies knowingly taking the banned substances.

“A lot of people are talking about that,” Silva said. “But it’s difficult. It’s easy for talk for doctors about that. Sometimes the athlete using the different supplements, because the rules are not easy. It changes all the time.”