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Conor McGregor: Floyd Mayweather is ‘running around the Showtime offices gathering my money’

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LAS VEGAS — Just when you thought the Floyd Mayweather talk died, it rose up Friday night.

At a gym day to promote UFC 202, Conor McGregor was asked about that potential boxing match with Mayweather that was bandied about a couple of months ago before the rematch with Nate Diaz was booked. McGregor said he'd be willing to box Mayweather, the undefeated legendary boxer — provided Mayweather and company pony up $100 million.

"Yeah, of course," McGregor said. "Right now I have Floyd running around the Showtime offices gathering my money. That's what he's doing. He's running around the Showtime offices, begging for those executives to come up with $100 million cash for me to fight me. So as soon as he gets my money, we can fight."

The UFC featherweight champion said competing in Mayweather's medium of boxing would be fine for him, but he criticized "Money" for hiding behind that limited rule set.

"If you want to fight me, we can fight," McGregor said. "If you need a specific rule set to protect you from a true fight, that's no problem. Just make sure that money is there. As long as that money is there, then we can fight under your safety net of rules. But me, I don't need rules. I am the f*cking rules.

"I've got the boxing community saying I can't box. And then I say, OK, let's fight. ‘Oh well, you can't kick or elbow or grapple. As long as you can't do that, then we box your ass up.' OK then. And then I've got the grappling community saying I can't grapple. So I say, OK let's fight. And then the grappling community be like, ‘Well, you can't box or kick. As long as you can't do that, then we grapple your ass up.' All these people saying I can't do this and I can't do that. I say, well let's fight then. You got all of these rules. They need to bring in rules to protect them. I don't need rules to protect me. I can fight any way."

Not that McGregor, 28, blames Mayweather for wanting to face him in boxing. That's a logical demand from Mayweather, the best draw of all time in the sport.

"I don't really hold it against him," McGregor said. "I wouldn't want to come into my world. How is he gonna come into my world? He's a novice where I come from. He's a phenomenal boxer, a phenomenal athlete, an intelligent businessman. But he's a novice in true fighting. That's a simple fact. I don't blame him for trying to make this set rules, under the boxing rules. Like I said, I have no problem going over there. I would not show up unconfident. I will show up there to kill that man and take that win down 100 percent. Why dominate one world when you can dominate two? We'll see how that plays out, though."

McGregor has been in Las Vegas for six weeks deep in a training camp. He'll be attempting to avenge his first UFC loss to Nate Diaz at UFC 202 on Aug. 20 at T-Mobile Arena. Diaz beat McGregor by second-round rear-naked choke submission at UFC 196 in March.

The bout, like the first one, will be contested at 170 pounds, two weight classes above where McGregor is the UFC champion at 145. Diaz typically fights at 155. "The Notorious" used the situation as a way to throw some shade at his peers and Mayweather, too.

"All I know is everyone is looking for rules, everyone is looking for weight, everyone is looking for cherry-picking opponents," McGregor said. "I'm up here facing a man that has a win over me and holds 30 pounds in weight on me. Look around the fight game. No one else is doing this. Nobody f*cking else. So, that's me. That's who I am."