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Mark Hunt ‘not surprised’ Brock Lesnar failed drug test

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Esther Lin, MMA Fighting

Mark Hunt said weeks before he even fought Brock Lesnar that he believed Lesnar was "juiced to the gills." So, the UFC heavyweight contender was not shocked that Lesnar tested positive for a banned substance in an out-of-competition test before UFC 200.

"Not surprised," Hunt said in a message to MMA Fighting.

Lesnar defeated Hunt by unanimous decision in the co-main event of UFC 200 last week in Las Vegas. That result will now be in question after the UFC announced that a Lesnar out-of-competition drug test from June 28 came back positive for a banned substance.

Lesnar, 38, faces a two-year suspension from USADA, the UFC's anti-doping partner, and further discipline from the Nevada Athletic Commission. Lesnar's victory will likely be overturned into a no-contest.

"I think he should be made an example of like every other cheater," Hunt said.

Hunt added on Twitter that this is the third time he's faced someone who tested positive, including Antonio Silva and Frank Mir.

The UFC granted Lesnar an exemption from a rule that states a fighter coming out of retirement must inform USADA four months out so that fighter can be placed into the drug-testing pool. Lesnar last fought for the UFC in 2011 before last week. The UFC said that since it has been so long since he competed that he would not have to give USADA four-months notice.

In an interview with FOX Sports Australia before the fight, Hunt went off on that exemption.

"I don't think that's fair. I think it's load of bullsh*t, I think it's rubbish," Hunt said. "I don't think anyone should be exempt from testing. If they're trying to clean the sport up — mixed martial arts — this is a bad way to do it. I don't care who you are. It's ridiculous.

"I don't think it's a great move. I think he's juiced to the gills — and I still think I'm going to knock him out. So I don't think that's correct."

USADA does not release the name of the substance a fighter tested positive for until after the adjudication process is over unless the fighter makes it public first. USADA refers to it as a "potential" anti-doping policy violation until a fighter has his or her fair due process.