Morning Report: Kenny Florian wants MMA judges subject to peer reviews, standardized technique scoring

Esther Lin, MMA Fighting

As with many fans and fighters alike, UFC veteran turned commentator Kenny Florian isn't satisfied with MMA judging's status quo. Relying on his 17 trips inside the Octagon, coupled with his part-time work calling fights, Florian aims to tackle the complicated issue of improving how best to score matches.

Along with some of the more standard revisions like installing monitors and requiring a better technical knowledge of the sport, Florian wants to see firmer standards for scoring certain techniques.

Another huge problem with judging is that we haven't really assigned values to specific techniques that are executed cleanly in the UFC. What value is a takedown versus a clean cross to the jaw? Is a knockdown valued the same as a near submission? Is a person going backward but landing punches not as effective versus a person going forward and eating punches? Is a high-amplitude takedown better than a foot sweep? These questions can be difficult to answer especially when seeing them performed at full speed in the context of a back-and-forth mixed martial arts contest. These are issues that should be discussed at length among judges.

Florian also recommends judges be held to higher standards of professionalism by being subject to periodic quasi-peer reviews.

I think we also need to hold the judges accountable for their actions. I doubt judges are paid very well, but money is always a pretty good motivator for job performance. How great would it be to have the judges reviewed by a panel of fellow judges, referees and fighters? This way we can reward good judging and penalize poor judging monetarily. After all, the fighters certainly pay for it financially in a big way if they are on the wrong end of a decision. I would also like to see quarterly reviews by an independent panel of judges, referees and fighters. This would help encourage judges to work hard to educate themselves and improve at their job. Fight footage and breakdown from fighters, judges and referees would really help explain things and help give good perspective on rounds won or lost.

Sound like a plan? Or is it just wishful thinking? Could Nevada's recent C.J. Ross scandal be enough to force larger commissions to revisit their modus operandi?

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MEDIA STEW

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TWEETS

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'Medium Severe' sounds like a cool band name.

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All quiet on the Lamas front.

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He'll be fine.

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Opponent ideas?

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The Gentleman.

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Less Froyo, more Acai.

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Can nudity be implied?

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But he's starting Wednesday?

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Eh?

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Unfortunately not Shawn's, but a great dog.

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FIGHT ANNOUNCEMENTS

Announced yesterday (Oct. 8 2013)

Julie Kedzie vs. Aleksandra Albu at UFC Fight Night 33

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FANPOST OF THE DAY

Today's Fanpost of the Day comes via a guy2.

Positioning: The Key to Everything (Part 1)

Position before submission. Everyone's heard that phrase before and it's a wonderfully apt reference to the core of most grappling arts. Striking, unfortunately, lacks the same type of concise and universally understood slogan. Instead, it has tragically misunderstood cliches such as "work the jab", "move your feet" and "hands up!" Part of that may be a problem with terminology. Position before punches? That obviously just doesn't have the same poetic beauty to it. I've never been good at titles so maybe someone better at words than me can give the essence of this article a nice little catch phrase.

In grappling, everyone knows what positioning is. You have the various guards, side mount, mount, back-control, all that good stuff. They are very clear, well-defined positions containing further positions within them. It is generally well-understood who is winning and what each person wants to do from these positions. In striking, positioning is infinitely more subtle and often barely visible. Especially to those who have simply never been taught what to look for. Thus, here is a basic guide to positioning while on the feet that may enhance both your training and viewing experiences of striking sports.

...

Check out the rest of the post here.

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Found something you'd like to see in the Morning Report? Just hit me up on Twitter @SaintMMA and we'll include it in tomorrow's column.

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